Award Lectures

The Endre A. Balazs Prize

The Endre A. Balazs Prize

Reza Dana, MD, MPH, MSc

The Council of ISER awards an International Prize to honor a distinguished scientist whose outstanding contributions provide significant progress in the field of experimental eye research. This prize was named the Endre A. Balazs Prize to honor Endre A. Balazs for his distinguished work in eye research and his contributions to the organization of the International Society for Eye Research. The Endre A. Balazs Prize is awarded at every Biennial Meeting of the Society for Eye Research.
The 2016 recipient of this Prize is Reza Dana. Dr. Reza Dana holds the Claes Dohlman Chair in Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. He is Director of the Cornea Service at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Senior Scientist at the Schepens Eye Research Institute/Mass Eye and Ear, and a member of the Harvard Medical School Graduate Program in Immunology (Committee on Immunology’). Dr. Dana studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ocular inflammation with applications in autoimmunity, transplantation, dry eye disease, and angiogenesis. A ‘Gold Fellow’ of ARVO, he has authored nearly 250 peer-reviewed articles and over 120 reviews and book chapters, and has delivered more than 200 invited and named lectures worldwide. He has been the recipient of multiple awards, including the RPB Special Scholar Award, RPB Physician-Scientist Award, and the Senior Scientific Investigator Award from Research to Prevent Blindness, the Cogan Award from ARVO, the LSU Chancellor’s Award in Neuroscience and Ophthalmology, and the Alcon Research Institute Award. Dr. Dana is Associate Editor of IOVS, and is on the editorial board of the journals Cornea, Scientific Reports (Nature Group), The Ocular Surface, Ophthalmologica, and UpToDate Rheumatology. In addition to his basic laboratory investigations, he leads a translational research program that has received 9 IND permits from the United States FDA in just the last few years. Dr. Dana has trained over 100 fellows and graduate students from more than 30 countries in his laboratory to date, and was the 2014 recipient of the A. Clifford Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award at Harvard Medical School.

The Endre A. Balazs Prize will be awarded during the Opening Ceremony on Monday, September 26, 10.30-12.00, room Concord AB.

The title of his lecture is: Regulation of Corneal and Ocular Surface Immunity


The Ernst H. Bárány Prize

The Ernst H. Bárány Prize

Lloyd P. Aiello MD, PhD

The Council of ISER awards an International Prize in honor of Professor Ernst H. Bárány, for his distinguished work in the field of ocular pharmacology. This award is presented to a distinguished scientist who has made outstanding contributions in research that increases our understanding of ocular pharmacology directly related to or applicable to glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, or related retinal diseases.
The 2016 recipient of this Prize is Lloyd Paul Aiello, MD, PhD, FARVO. Dr. Aiello is Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, Vice Chair for Centers of Excellence and Associate Chief of Longwood Ophthalmology at Harvard Department of Ophthalmology, Director of the Beetham Eye Institute and Head of Eye Research at the Joslin Diabetes Center, and Founding Chair of the National Eye Institute Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR). He received his doctoral degree in Biochemistry and a medical degree from Boston University School of Medicine. He completed residency in ophthalmology at the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute at Johns Hopkins University and Hospital before coming to the Joslin Diabetes Center, where he completed both a clinical vitreoretinal, and a research fellowship. He joined the Joslin staff in 1994. Dr. Aiello is an internationally recognized expert in the area of diabetic retinopathy basic and clinical research, and has made extensive care-changing contributions especially in relation to VEGF and related factors. His research addresses biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying early diabetic retinopathy, the development of novel interventions, and the subsequent therapeutic evaluation through design and implementation of rigorous phase 1-3 clinical trials. He has been involved in setting standards for diabetic eye care nationally and internationally for many years. Dr. Aiello spearheaded seminal basic science studies elucidating the role of VEGF and other factors in mediating diabetic eye disease. The results allowed the identification of various pharmacologic interventions to prevent the main causes of diabetic visual loss. He demonstrated beneficial effects in animal models and was a major contributor designing, implementing and analyzing key clinical trials eventually leading to FDA approval of antiVEGF therapies for diabetic macular edema (DME). Based upon his original findings, and with his involvement, DRCR showed these therapies are an alternate treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Dr. Aiello and colleagues have also found nonVEGF pathways mediating DME and a new small molecule inhibitor is entering phase 2 clinical trials with potential to treat patients who do not respond well to AntiVEGF. Dr. Aiello has authored over 300 publications including contributions to the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Medicine, Lancet and many others. He is recipient of 50 national and international awards for his research including the Champalimaud Vision Award, the world's largest prize in eye research and the highest distinction in ophthalmology and visual science.

The Ernst H. Bárány Prize will be awarded during the Plenary Lecture on Tuesday, September 27, 10.30-11.45, room Concord AB.

The title of his lecture is: The Pharmacologic Revolution in Treatment of Diabetic Eye Disease


The Retina Research Foundation’s Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

The Retina Research Foundation’s Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research

King-Wai Yau, PhD

The Council of ISER accepted a proposal from the Retina Research Foundation (RRF), Houston, Texas, to present the Foundation’s Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research at ISER’s biennial congresses beginning in 1986. Nominees for and recipients of the award are selected by Foundation officials interacting with a committee appointed by the ISER Council. Founded in 1969, Retina Research Foundation is a publicly supported, tax-exempt charitable organization that conducts an ongoing program of basic vision science research devoted to the retina and retinal diseases. The Paul Kayser International Award in Retina Research was created by the Directors of Retina Research Foundation and endowed by the Trustees of The Kayser Foundation to honor and perpetuate the memory of longtime friend and dedicated benefactor of RRF Paul Kayser. Through this award both organizations are demonstrating the conviction they shared with Mr. Kayser that blindness caused by retinal disease is a global concern and must be addressed accordingly. It is thus the purpose of this award to foster greater awareness of the need for intensive study of the retina, its role in the visual process, and the retinal diseases that threaten and/or destroy eyesight by recognizing outstanding achievement and sustaining meritorious scientific investigations worldwide. The 2016 recipient of this award is King-Wai Yau, PhD. King-Wai Yau was born in China and grew up in Hong Kong. After high school and a year of medical school there, he came to the US and received an A.B. in physics from Princeton (1971, University Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi) and a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Harvard (1975) under John Nicholls. He did postdoctoral work with Denis Baylor at Stanford, developing the suction-pipette-recording method that revolutionized the study of retinal rods and cones. He spent 1979-81 at Cambridge, England with Sir Alan Hodgkin, during which time he became intrigued by rod/cone phototransductions. In 1981, he moved to Department of Physiology and Biophysics at University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, where he contributed greatly to solving this problem. He rose to full professor in 1985, and, a year later, relocated to Johns Hopkins as Professor of Neuroscience and HHMI Investigator. At Hopkins, Yau investigated rod/cone phototransductions in ever greater detail. He also expanded over time into molecular biology, olfactory transduction, ionchannel molecular physiology, mouse genetics, intrinsically-photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, as well as retinal diseases and some translational work. Yau received England’s Rank Prize in Optoelectronics (with Denis Baylor and Trevor Lamb) in 1980, the Friedenwald Award from the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (1993), the Alcon Award in Eye Research twice (1994, 2005), the Magnes Prize from Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1996), the Balazs Prize from International Society for Eye Research (2006), Portugal’s Antonio Champalimaud Vision Award (with Jeremy Nathans) in 2008, CNIB Chanchlani Global Vision Award, Canada (2012), and the tri-yearly National Academy of Sciences Alexander Hollaender Award in Biophysics (2013). Yau is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Retina Research Foundation’s Paul Kayser International Award for Retina Research will be awarded during the Plenary Lecture on Wednesday, September 28, 10.30-11.45, room Concord AB.

The title of his lecture is: Melanopsin Signaling in the Eye

 

The Ludwig von Sallmann Prize

The Ludwig von Sallmann Prize

Rosalie K. Crouch, PhD

Ludwig von Sallmann was a distinguished international ophthalmologist and ophthalmic investigator who served on the staffs of Vienna, Peking, and Columbia Universities and the Ophthalmology Branch of the former National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness at the National Institutes of Health. His wife, Henrietta von Sallmann, established a trust fund to award, in his memory, a cash prize every two years to an individual who has distinguished himself or herself by making a significant contribution to vision research and ophthalmology. The 2016 recipient of this Prize is Rosalie Kelsey Crouch, PhD. Dr. Rosalie Kelsey Crouch trained as a synthetic organic chemist and has studied the role of retinoids in ocular diseases throughout her career. She holds degrees from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, Lehigh University and Albert Einstein School of Medicine. Her postdoctoral studies were with Koji Nakanishi at Columbia University, while at the same time balancing the arrival of her two children. Her academic career has been at the Medical University of South Carolina. As an administrator, she rose to the rank of Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs. As a researcher, she is known for her research on retinoid biochemistry and has made important (and unexpected) findings on the actions of retinoids in the visual process and disorders, often using retinal analogues to probe structure and function. Her current interest is on probing the potential for the role of bis-retinoids in retinal degenerations. She has served on numerous editorial boards, been continuously supported for her research, and published over 250 papers. The role of women in science has been a particular interest, and she has written and spoken widely in this area. She has received numerous awards including the American Society for Photobiology Award for Research, the South Carolina Governor’s Award for Science, and Distinguished University Professor. She has mentored many students, several of whom have made significant contributions to the field of vision. She synthesized 11-cis retinal for vision researcher community, obtainable through the NEI. She is also the proud grandmother of three, birdwatcher, change-bell ringer and duplicate bridge player.

The Ludwig von Sallmann Prize will be awarded during the Plenary Lecture on Thursday, September 29, 10.30-11.45, room Concord AB.

The title of her lecture is: Retinoids and Retinal Degenerations